History

Pierre S. de Beaumont started an independent, private foundation in 1998, with a broad health-related purpose. Mr. de Beaumont wanted his philanthropy to reduce human suffering from disease, but chose to give the Foundation’s Board of Directors ultimate discretion in the choice of specific funding priorities.

Mr. de Beaumont believed in a broad mandate for the Foundation and supported a general concentration on public health, where he hoped the Foundation could make a significant impact. He was strongly interested in initiating programs that had the potential to become self-sustaining and particularly liked entrepreneurial projects that could be profitable.

Mr. de Beaumont encouraged the Foundation to follow sound corporate management principals, such as excellent customer service, and to be nimble and responsive to worthy requests. He believed in the concept of engaged philanthropy, which is why the Foundation has always worked closely with its grantees. Mr. de Beaumont preferred projects that had specific outcomes and would provide additional support to ensure that those outcomes could be expanded or taken to scale. As a result, the Foundation has worked with grantees to see an initial idea developed, implemented, and evaluated; as well as supported subsequent projects that grew out of initial grants.

de Beaumont Timeline

1998

1998

Pierre “Pete” S. de Beaumont


Pierre “Pete” S. de Beaumont
incorporates an independent, private foundation.

Bylaws are adopted naming the following directors: Mr. Pierre S. de Beaumont; James Sprague, MD; Murray Brennan, MD; and Leroy Parker, MD.

1999

1999

The de Beaumont Foundation is awarded 501(c) (3) status as a tax-exempt private foundation.

2001

2001

The de Beaumont Foundation awards its first grant to the Molecular Immunology Foundation to support cancer vaccine research.

2002

2002

Richard Burnes and Carol Massoni join the Board of Directors.

The Foundation expands its funding with a grant to the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health to support emergency preparedness efforts.

2004

2004

Elizabeth T. Miller is hired to formalize the Foundation’s operations.

The Foundation expands its emergency preparedness funding with a grant to the Arlington Department of Health to develop a public health emergency volunteer management system.

2005

2005

Dr. James SpragueDr. James Sprague is elected Chairman of the Board of Directors.

The Board bestows the honorary title of Chairman-Emeritus to Pierre S. de Beaumont.

2006

2006

The de Beaumont Fellowship for Cancer Vaccine Research is established, with a grant to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

2007

2007

Dr. James Sprague becomes the full-time CEO, and Edmund B. Cabot, MD joins the Board of Directors.

The de Beaumont Foundation opens its Bethesda, Maryland office on River Road.

2008

2008

The de Beaumont Foundation conducts a needs assessment with public health leaders across the country.

The Foundation refines its focus on public health and the Board adopts a new mission statement: The de Beaumont Foundation seeks to strengthen the capacity and effectiveness of local health departments.

2009

2009

2009

The de Beaumont Foundation funds the first face-to-face meeting for the Big Cities Health Coalition, convening health directors of the largest cities in the United States.

2010

2010

Mr. de Beaumont dies and leaves his estate to the Foundation.

public-health-inititative-transparent

The Foundation begins its partnership with the Public Health Informatics Institute at The Task Force for Global Health.

2011

2011

Ariel MoyerAriel Moyer is hired as the Foundation’s Chief Operating Officer.

Foundation funds fuel expansion of New York City’s Epi Scholars program to Los Angeles and Seattle.

2012

2012

BCCBrian C. Castrucci is hired as the Foundation’s Chief Program and Strategy Officer.

John M. Stevens, Jr. joins the Board of Directors.

As part of the NYC Macroscope Project, the Foundation funds the NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HANES), which helps determine whether electronic health records can be used to assess population health.

2013

2013

Gregory M. Wagner, MD and John Auerbach, MBA join the Board of Directors.

The Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (JPHMP) publishes a supplement devoted to the Big Cities Health Coalition.

Partnering with ASTHO, the Foundation hosts and convenes the Public Health Workforce Strategy meeting, which leads to the creation of the National Consortium for Public Health Workforce Development.

2014

2014

The Foundation reaches full endowment; it moves to new offices at 7501 Wisconsin Avenue in Bethesda to accommodate its growing staff.

programslogo-playbook

The Practical Playbook to Integrate Primary Care and Public Health launches at a National Press Club news conference featuring a keynote address from J. Michael McGinnis, MD, MPP, National Academy of Medicine, The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

The Foundation collaborates with ASTHO on the Public Health Workforce Interest and Needs Survey (PH WINS), the first nationally representative assessment of public health workers.

The Foundation’s first blog post, The Next Transformation in American Health Care, is published in The Huffington Post; the blog quickly sparks national conversations.

2015

2015

Ed-HunterEdward L. Hunter is hired as President and CEO. Dr. Sprague continues his service as Chair of the Board of Directors.

The Build Health Challenge

The BUILD Health Challenge announces its first awardees at a National Press Club news conference featuring a keynote address from Karen B. DeSalvo, MD, MPH, Acting Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The Practical PlaybookOxford University Press publishes the textbook version of the Practical Playbook.

JPHMP publishes a supplement devoted to the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey.